International Organization of Internet Clock Watchers

This is clock.org (tick, tick, tick ...). The grand organization name is simultaneously silly puffery and serious. There is a more detailed explanation of what clock.org is about. One day, when we find where we put that box of 'round-to-its, we'll complete the project which inspired this domain. In the mean time ...

[donate your idle CPU time to distributed.net!]

What's Here

The items of note on this web server are:


Acknowledgements

We are grateful to the Vicious Fishes for having provided a space in which this humble system did exist in the wake of career changes that happened to its owner back in 1997. It's good to have friends.

Another set of friends who run a proper ISP also provided services to this system for many years: Idiom Internet Services. They're a small operation, but they're run by real computer people who also know how to run a profitable business - an ideal combination for an ISP. I highly recommend their services.

We are similarly grateful to the NetBSD Project for finally making the promise of UNIX come true: a modern operating system that is computer architecture independent. NetBSD is the same regardless of whether you're cursed with an Intel Pentium CPU at the heart of your computer or blessed with one of the many superior RISC alternatives (e.g. PowerPC, Alpha, ARM, SPARC, MIPS). This makes it possible for you (and me!) to buy whatever computer hardware is best, for the lowest price. The icing on the cake is that the entire source code to this operating system is FREE, to study and learn from. Therefore,

this site runs NetBSD Multiarchitecture OS.

In addition, the Apache Group has produced an excellent Hyper-Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP, a.k.a. Web) server for UNIX systems. It is powerful, flexible, and also free. So, as above,

our HTTP server is Apache 1.3.6

Isn't the Internet just the coolest thing? Now, if everyone would simply write software that was compliant with its standards ...

[Encryption Policy]

In the Internet of today, most of the traffic goes "in the clear" - anyone who can tap the wires, lawfully or not, can see all. Modern personal computers, with strong encryption software, are about to give us our privacy back again.

Some agencies of the United States Government (notably the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)), want to prevent the deployment of encryption technology. They want either encryption so weak that just about anyone can break it, or they want a copy of every key used with strong encryption. This would be equivalent to a town with no locks on the front doors, or where the sheriff has a copy of every door key (just in case he has to search the house).

Tell Congress that this is wrong.

In the mean time, use strong crypto like SSH and PGP to do your communications with so as to frustrate those who want to spy on you.

[EFF Online Free Speech Blue Ribbon Campaign]

The Internet community in the U.S.A. has won the first round against the opponents of freedom of speech and free expression, but the struggle against censorship isn't over yet; the oppressors have vowed to try once again, despite the ringing 9-0 decision against them by the United States Supreme Court.

A hearty "Congratulations!" to the Citizen's Internet Empowerment Coalition (CIEC) who were the plaintiffs in "American Civil Libterties Union (ACLU) versus Janet Reno (United States Attorney General)" for their pivotal part in the victory for liberty, but one must never forget that, "Eternal Vigilance is the price of Freedom."


There are other clocks out on the Internet, including:


Your friendly webmasters // webmaster@clock.org
Last modified: Sun Jan 27 11:51:40 PST 2013